"z" is for Zen

NUTRITIONAL Zen

It’s both something we are— the true reality of our toxic state, our individual biochemistry and our bad habits and cravings expressing themselves moment by moment—and something we do—a disciplined practice of consuming foods through which we can realize the joy of detoxifying and healing.

"Do you realize you spelled the word phaze wrong on your website?

 

From 2009-2010 I was exposed to high levels of Stachybotrys, Chaetomium, Aspergillus, Penicillium, Wallemia and Cladosporium in a home that I rented. 
 

From 2011-2013 I went through 2 long and grueling years of mold detox to save my life.  In 2013 I started the website SurvivingToxicMold.com and created the original "Mold Detox Diet".

Therefore I coined a new term I like to call:  "Nutritional Zen"

 

What is Nutritional Zen?
It’s both something we are— the true reality of our toxic state, our individual biochemistry and our bad habits and cravings expressing themselves moment by moment—and something we do—a disciplined practice of consuming foods through which we can realize the joy of detoxifying and healing.

It is not a belief system or fad diet to which one converts. There is no dogma or doctrine. Nutritional Zen is the direct experience of what we might call our ultimate truth and reality, or the absolute, yet it is not separate from the ordinary, the relative. This direct experience is our healing journey with food as a tool.

 

 “Buddha” simply means “awakened one.” His great teaching was that we can all awaken; that fundamentally, we are all buddhas— Jewish buddhas, Christian buddhas, Hindu buddhas, Islamic buddhas, Ashanti buddhas, Haudenasaunee buddhas, secular buddhas.

With this flexible and accommodating attitude toward the various cultures and beliefs it encountered, Buddhism was embraced throughout Asia. In China, it merged with Taoism and evolved into Ch’an, the Chinese word for meditation, which became “Zen” in Japan. Over the past few decades, it has become very much a part of Western culture. Indeed, the historian Arnold Toynbee said that one of the most significant events of the twentieth century was the movement of Buddhism from East to West.

Through a dedicated and consistent meditation practice, we can realize that self and other are One, that the conditioned and unconditioned are simultaneous, that absolute and relative are identical. Out of this realization flows a natural compassion and wisdom, a peaceful and intuitively appropriate response toward whatever circumstances may arise. We don’t make a big deal about it; we don’t even call it religion. When the Dalai Lama was asked about Buddhism, he simply said, “My religion is kindness.”

So, again, what is Zen? Stop now. Stop trying to get an intellectual lock on something that is vast and boundless, far more than the rational mind can grasp. Just breathe in with full awareness. Taste the breath. Appreciate it fully. Now breathe out, slowly, with equal appreciation. Give it all away; hold onto nothing. Breathe in with gratitude; breathe out with love. Receiving and offering—this is what we are doing each time we inhale and exhale. To do so with conscious awareness, on a regular basis, is the transformative practice we call Zen.

This simple yet profound practice can release us from the shackles of past and future, as well as from the self-imposed and imprisoning barriers we erect around what we erroneously consider our separate and unchanging identities.

Who do we think we are, anyway? When we really look deeply, it becomes the koan “Who am I?” We find that the conditioned views and compulsive traits we have come to call “self” have no fixed substance. We can, through consistent zazen, free ourselves from that imposter self and discover the true self—the being that is open, confident, and unhindered, flowing with all that exists in this very moment. Thus quite naturally we care for the environment, starting with our own actions: not wasting the earth’s precious resources, realizing that every act has consequences. And quite naturally we extend This Mind; we vow to live with attention, integrity, and authenticity; we vow to free all beings from suffering.

It's my goal to share recipes that are not only Mold Detox-compliant but that also look and taste delicious as well.

"As someone who has lived through a horrific mold exposure I struggled to stick to a diet full of (what you can't have).  I knew in order for me to beat this I was going to have to psychologically come up with a solution to make it an achievable goal. 

So, instead of getting rid of 90% of all foods cold turkey I did my research and organized the foods to remove in a proprietary order.  Once I began to follow this order it was easy to stay on the diet and get through detox much better." 

~ Jennifer Cannon, creator of the PhazeMoldDiet

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